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Academic Insights for the Thinking World

Friday procrastination: milking edition

By Alice Northover


It’s been an eventful week in Oxford spires (although I write this from the New York office which contains no spires). We had a kerfuffle over the OED and we’re gearing up for the Place of the Year extravaganza next week. So what have we learned in between?

Neither plank nor batman nor owl of night keep these students from the swift completion of their appointed reads. But milk might.

Appropriate after Black Friday and Cyber Monday, our OED Appeal of the week: Doorbuster.

The DSM definitions are always a source of controversy, the newest being personality disorders.

The end is in sight for the published works of Leonhard Euler.

How do you come up with the perfect brand name? Wordnik [good name] has the scoop.

Can you own page turning?

Our Australian cousins, the ANDC, have Ned Kelly in words and phrases (that I would very much like to adopt).

Wikipedia is partnering with JSTOR, so those citations may be getting better.

NYU Local examines replyallcalyse, or how Nicholas Cage will make your inbox explode.

Are you a hipster? What your reading habits reveal (about your cigarette jeans-wearing, Williamsburg neighbors, not you of course).

New on the dictionary insult list: “Give him credit this week, he’s got his very own word in the English dictionary, omnishambles.” (As opposed to the more traditional: “If you look up stupid in the dictionary, your face is there.”)

Can e-books help get books to remote communities in Latin America?

The Irish Times has appointed a poetry editor. (h/t Leslie Kaufman)

I’m sad not more people read Rob St. Amant’s amazing article on robots replicating animal tool use (promoting OUPblog content I know but it’s awesome).

Alexandra Lange on place setting anxiety.

And finally, stay curious my friends.

Alice Northover joined Oxford University Press as Social Media Manager in January 2012. She is editor of the OUPblog, constant tweeter @OUPAcademic, daily Facebooker at Oxford Academic, and Google Plus updater of Oxford Academic, amongst other things. You can learn more about her bizarre habits on the blog.

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