Oxford University Press's
Academic Insights for the Thinking World

Capturing the Beholder with Honest Art

It is no secret that art moves us in mysterious ways. Below Cait Irwin, author of Monochrome Days: A Firsthand Account of One Teenager’s Experience With Depression, describes how art helped her cope with depression.

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Women’s History Month: Feminism and Art

There is no perfect marriage between feminism (as a political ideology) and art (as a cultural activity). Feminism promises at the same time to enrich the products of art, to expose the pretensions and vested interests in art and to break open the category of art altogether.

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Finding My Way from Stonehenge to Samarkand

By Brian Fagan When I sat down to compile my latest book From Stonehenge to Samarkand, I found my greatest inspiration in the writings of a virtually forgotten English writer, Rose Macaulay. Her classic book, Pleasure of Ruins, first appeared in the 1950s and was reprinted with evocative photographs by Reny Beloff a decade later. […]

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What is “American” in American art?
Thoughts on the Whitney Biennial

by Barbara Novak The Whitney Biennial has been notably challenged lately for including European artists in a show at a Museum of American Art. But such critiques misunderstand the nature of the question “What is American in American Art?” “American” is not a nationally distilled “ingredient” injected into our art by virtue of birth or […]

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