Wednesday Jun 18th, 2014

A globalized history of “baron,” part 2

I will begin with a short summary of the previous post. In English texts, the noun baron surfaced in 1200, which means that it became current not much earlier than the end of the twelfth century. It has been traced to Semitic (a fanciful derivation), Celtic, Latin (a variety of proposals), and Germanic. The Old English words beorn “man; fighter, warrior” and bearn “child… read more »

Wednesday Jul 30th, 2014

Monthly etymology gleanings for July 2014

Anatoly Liberman answers readers’ questions
Wednesday Jul 23rd, 2014

Which witch?

An essay on loss, perversity, and onomatopoeia
Wednesday Jul 16th, 2014

Living in a buzzworld

Anatoly Liberman on euphemisms
Wednesday
Jul 9th, 2014

Monthly etymology gleanings for June 2014, part 2

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Friday
Jul 4th, 2014

Rhetorical fireworks for the Fourth of July

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Wednesday
Jul 2nd, 2014

Monthly etymology gleanings for June 2014, part one

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Saturday
Jun 21st, 2014

How social media is changing language

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Sunday
Jun 15th, 2014

When is a book a tree?

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Saturday
Jun 7th, 2014

What is a book? (humour edition)

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Wednesday
Jun 4th, 2014

What is a book?

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